Mike Heraty’s take on Alamos


Alamos, Sonora, Mexico and Pagosa Springs

Posted on by

This blog entry will not have much to do with real estate. If you want or need specific real estate data or assistance, drop me an email at MikeHeraty@frontier.net, or call me at 970 264-7000.

ALAMOS, SONORA, MEXICO

I recently returned from a trip to northern Mexico at the edge of the Sierra Madres to the town of Alamos within the State of Sonora. Interestingly, the town is about the same size as Pagosa Springs. It is a Spanish Colonial Mining Town founded in 1681 following the discovery of silver in the area. Because of the great wealth created from nearby silver mines, scores of large colonial Spanish mansions were built in the town. Many were destroyed in the early 1900’s before Americans began to rediscover the area in the 1940’s. A number of the families living in Alamos can trace their heritage back to first settlers that came to work the mines.  Presently there are a number of Americans that maintain homes there for the winter months, and a few that live there all year, though I have found the summer heat to be quite intense. Like Pagosa Springs, Alamos has struggled during the recession to continue to attract tourists that are willing to spend money locally. Unlike Pagosa Springs, they have also had to deal with all the negative press relating to the drug wars that continue to plague many parts of the country. Though there has not been any drug violence in Alamos (it is far enough off the cocaine highway) the number of visitors from the U.S. has declined sharply and the town has seen a significant reduction in tourist dollars flowing into its coffers. Still, they work hard to keep their city clean, safe and friendly. They do a good job of promoting Alamos with a series of events scheduled throughout the year. While I was there last month the 28th Annual Festival Alfonso Ortiz Tirado was underway. This is a music and art festival named after a famous opera singer and doctor that was born in Alamos in 1893.

This year performers came from Puerto Rico, Brazil, Cuba, Costa Rica and other Central and South American countries. The following link will take you to the Festival Program Guide- get ready to polish up on your Spanish:  Alamos Festival         The event was attended by loads of Mexican nationals, many from within the region, but many from as far away at Mexico City and Oaxaca. About a third of those attending the festival were foreigners, from Central America, Europe, South America and Gringos like myself from the U.S.  Everything was very well organized, events began and ended on schedule and provided everyone with a fabulous variety of musical performances. Thursday evening the group Puerto Rican Power played for the crowd and had everyone on their feet dancing the salsa:  Friday evening the group Opera Prima Rock performed a two hour tribute to the music of Queen. I was amazed how popular their music was and how many members of the audience knew all the lyrics. The group had everyone on their feet for the encore “We Are the Champions”.

 

OPERA PRIMA ROCK

Saturday evening the Italian Tenor Alessandro Safina performed. In 2007 he recorded a duet with British Soprano Sarah Brightman for her Symphony album and joined her on her Symphony World Tour for 2008 and 2009. His vocals and his orchestra were fabulous. Following his performance,  Callejoneada con la Estudiantina Dr. Alfonso Ortiz Tirado completed the music celebration with all of the musical artists dressed in 17th century Spanish costumes, parading through the streets and alleys of Alamos playing traditional songs and telling stories. This went on until the wee hours of the morning. In all, the experience was wonderful.

Anyway, what I found most interesting is how well attended the Festival was. You had to travel 30 miles west of Alamos to the city of Navajoa to find lodging if you had not made a reservation at least two months earlier. The Festival has been sponsored and coordinated by a group of stakeholders including the Town of Alamos and surrounding communities, the State of Sonora the National Institute of Fine Arts, with commercial financial support from Coca Cola, Corona, and Telmex. This is a festival I would highly recommend to any music and culture lover. The people are warm and friendly, lodging is great within Alamos if you plan ahead. My two favorite lodging facilities in Alamos happen to be owned by Americans: Hacienda de los Santos and Hotel Colonial.

Hacienda de los Santos, one of three pools.

Both of these hotels are exceptional. Within HDLS is the Poncho Villa Cantina, where Poncho Villa stood after entering the town. If you are a Tequilla drinker, you will find over 500 different bottles of the spirit within the bar. If you can’t find one you like, you’d better think about changing drinks!

 

 

Pancho Villa Tequilla Bar at Hacienda de los Santos

Hotel Colonial, Alamos. Janet Anderson, Proprietor.

The restaurants in Alamos are very good and very economical.  I love the food at Hacienda and Las Palmeras is a great spot for lunch or a casual dinner. Terisita’s Panaderia y Bistro is my favorite for a cappuccino and breakfast pastry, a great place to start the day and check email with their WiFi connection.

Outside Seating at Terisita’s Panaderia Y Bistro

 

You can reach the town of Alamos by driving a little over one hour south from Ciudad Obregon, where you can catch a flight from Phoenix on Aero Mexico with a connection in Hermosillo. Alternatively, if you don’t mind a longer and much more economical journey, you can take a first class luxury bus with on board video sets and Wi-Fi from Phoenix or Tucson. While in town I did check out the local real estate scene. Not much had changed from my previous visit in June of last year. A few properties are moving, but very slowly and at prices well below the peak of 2007. Few Americans are buying and many more are trying to sell. Very few Sellers have shown a willingness to greatly reduce their asking prices. Instead, they seem determined to remain patient, a concept that seems more abundant within Mexico.  The decline in buying interest from Americans has, to some extent been partially offset by a renewed interest from Mexican nationals.  It was also interesting to see the increase in Canadians in Alamos.  Alamos Gold of Toronto, Canada owns a huge gold mining and milling operation just west of Alamos which is targeting production in excess of 150,000 ounces of gold for the year, generating gross revenues of over $200 million. Perhaps this investment in the area will create more visitors to Alamos from our northern neighbor. I initiated a discussion with a resident American of creating a Sister City relationship with Pagosa Springs. The Town of Alamos currently has a Sister City relationship with an Arizona community, but nothing with any Colorado towns. It might be a mutually beneficial relationship, given the similarities of the towns. If you think you would enjoy the wonderfully interesting culture of Old Mexico, I highly recommend you consider a visit to Alamos, and I would suggest visiting during the Festival Alfonso Ortiz Tirado in January. Be sure to book your trip early in order to obtain good local lodging.

Quite Street in Alamos at 6:30 a.m.A Quiet Street Scene in Alamos at 6:30 a.m. the day after the end of The Festival.

 


La colección de tequila de la Hacienda está considerada entre las mejores

 

Las ánimas y los espíritus: Álamos en una copa

 

Estamos regresando de un paseo por las calles de Álamos, Sonora, con los pies adoloridos pero sin ganas de soltar ese espíritu de alegría que parece haber tomado posesión de nuestro cuerpo. Para saciar la sed, sacamos la mano para alcanzar algo de tomar. Y, misteriosamente, aparece una botella de tequila.

 

Con la música de la celebración del Festival Cultural Alfonso Ortiz Tirado reverberando aún en nuestros oídos abrimos la botella de Murmullo Añejo, un regalo sorpresa de nuestro anfitrión y el dueño de la Hacienda de los Santos, Jim Swickard.

 

Según Jim, este tequila se debe tomar con calma y en sorbos, sin limón ni sal (él da clases de cómo apreciar un buen tequila). Así que, entre un caballito y otro, nos encontramos intercambiando historias, inspirados por este elixir delicioso y este pueblo embriagador. Entre una copa y otra, escuchamos el paso de las ánimas de Álamos, mezcladas en la brisa y el murmullo de las hojas.

 

La próxima noche nos informan que el tequila no se toma de noche, sino que tradicionalmente lo toman durante el día. Pero lo que descubrimos es que realmente no hay reglas para el consumo de la bebida nacional de México. Quizás porque es simplemente una bebida para ser compartida y saboreada con los amigos, a cualquier hora y en cualquier lugar. Lo cierto es que estar en Sonora tiene sus ventajas.

 

“A veces el tequila que venden fuera de México difiere de lo que dice la etiqueta,” dice Jim, cuya colección de más de 400 botellas de tequila es una de las más grandes en el país. Y, contrario a lo que muchos piensan, no existe el famoso gusano en el fondo de la botella.

 

No es hasta el final de nuestra jornada que nos platican del Bacanora, un licor pre-colonial destilado del agave pero más fuerte que el tequila, y único en el estado de Sonora. Pero no importa. Aquí, sentados junto a la hoguera en esta fresca noche sonorense, nos prometemos a nosotros mismos y a nuestras amigas las ánimas que, algún día, regresaríamos aquí.

 

 

“El Agave Cafe”: Una historia de amor

A dish called Sonora

Wednesday February 15, 2012

They say the way to a man’s heart is through his  stomach. Over four days in Sonora, Mexico, I lost my heart three square meals a  day.

At first, attempting to curb my normal  enthusiasm for new cuisine, I tried to resist the allure of the local  gastronomy, approaching each bite with a coolness normally reserved for a first  date. But with each passing morsel, I felt my guard slip further. So by the end  of our first day together, I was unable to contain my love of all tastes Sonoran.

Sure, I’d flirted with Mexican cuisine before: a  burrito here and there, a taco or two, the odd quesadilla, and arguably the most  un-Mexican of Mexican dishes – nachos. But for the most part, Mexican food  remained a mystery: a cuisine well known, but largely unrealized.

It wasn’t until I landed in Sonora, and lifted  the veil of that first tortilla, that I began to understand what Mexican food was  really about. Yes, there are beans, there is cheese, and there are more forms  of corn than you could poke a Taquito  at. But there is much, much more.

Upon introduction, at the El Agave Café, I gush  over the green and red salsa, which with the creamy guacamole, comes as a  precursor to nearly every meal. Served with a smooth bottle of Pacifica (beer),  this is followed by a fiery tortilla soup (a red chili and cheese broth),  smoking-hot enchiladas (flatbread rolled around a filling and covered with a  hot pepper sauce) and a sweet coconut flan. Not a bad first date.

Then,  less than 24 hours later, we find ourselves sitting down for breakfast, where  traditional refried beans, Huevos Mexicanos (eggs scrambled with salsa) and chilaquiles (Mexican bubble and  squeak) accompany fresh fruit juices. So much for taking it slowly.Later that day, on a walk through the town of  Alamos, I am introduced to the local markets. Here, churros, coyotas (cookies  filled with brown sugar) and sweet pastries – some served from the back of a pick-up  truck – vie for the business of cashed-up, sugar-hungry children. I opt for the  potato chips, doused in fresh lime juice and chili sauce.

Over the next 48 hours, I am seduced by everything  from a light green chili soup to tostadas (a Mexican open-faced ‘sandwich’),  from chile relleno (stuffed peppers) to chimichangas (a deep fried burrito).  But my favourite dish, the one for which I fall hardest, is the tamales (a corn-based  dough, steamed in banana leaves).

 

And then, with a heavy heart, and full stomach, my journey through Sonora is suddenly over.

But as I overlook the Gulf of California from the village of San Carlos, with tasty tamarind margarita in hand, I realize that this is a love affair that will linger on.

 

For more information on Sonora, and Mexico,  visit: www.visitmexico.com.

 

 

 

Un plato llamado Sonora

Miércoles 15 de febrero de 2012

Dicen que el amor entra por la cocina. En los cuatros días que estuve en Sonora, México, quedé enamorada en tres comidas al día.

 

En un intento de frenar mi entusiasmo normal por una cocina desconocida, al principio quise resistir el encanto de esta gastronomía local. Saboreaba cada bocado con la imparcialidad que acostumbro mantener en una primera cita. Sin embargo, con cada cucharada, sentía que mis defensas se desmoronaban. Al cierre del primer día juntos, mi amor por la comida sonorense era un hecho.

 

Claro que ya había coqueteado en uno que otro momento con la comida mexicana: un burrito por aquí, un taco por allá, una que otra quesadilla y luego ese platillo que realmente nada tiene que ver con México, los nachos. Sin embargo, la comida mexicana seguía siendo un misterio para mi; era una cocina conocida, pero no vivida.

 

No fue hasta que aterricé en Sonora y levanté el velo de esa primera tortilla que empecé a comprender exactamente de qué trataba esta famosa comida mexicana. Sí, hay frijoles, hay queso y hay más clases de maíz de lo que uno se imagina. Pero la cocina mexicana es mucho más complicada.

 

En mi primer día en El Agave Café me presentaron una salsa roja y una verde, cual de las dos más deliciosas. Éstas, junto con un rico guacamole, se sirven de aperitivo antes de casi todas las comidas en el café. Lo disfruté todo con una botella de cerveza Pacífica, y acto seguido me tomé una picosa sopa de tortilla, unas enchiladas acabadas de salir del horno y un dulce flan de coco. Nada mal para ser nuestra primera cita.

 

Entonces, a menos de 24 horas, nos encontramos sentados frente a la mesa para el desayuno con los tradicionales frijoles refritos, los huevos mexicanos y los chilaquiles, acompañados por jugos de fruta fresca. Y eso que lo iba a tomar con calma. Esa tarde salí a caminar por el pueblo de Álamos y me presentaron los mercados locales. Aquí, los churros, las coyotas y el pan dulce (algunos a la venta desde la cajeula de una camioneta) compiten por el negocio de los chiquillos con dinero y en pos de azúcar. Yo opté por las papitas con jugo de limón y chile.

 

Durante las próximas 48 horas, me sedujo una sopa de chile verde, seguida de unas tostadas, un chile relleno y una chimichanga. Pero mi plato favorito, por encima de todos, fue un plato de tamales.

 

Y así, de repente, se acabó mi jornada en Sonora, y me fui con el corazón encogido pero la barriga contenta.

 

Ahora bien, aquí estoy sentada ahora observando el Mar de Cortés desde el pueblo de San Carlos con una rica margarita de tamarindo en mano, y me voy dando cuenta que ésta es una historia de un amor que perdura…

 

Para más información de Sonora, y de México, visite: www.visitmexico.com.

 

 

Un plato llamado Sonora

Miércoles 15 de febrero de 2012

Dicen que el amor entra por la cocina. En los cuatros días que estuve en Sonora, México, quedé enamorada en tres comidas al día.

 

En un intento de frenar mi entusiasmo normal por una cocina desconocida, al principio quise resistir el encanto de esta gastronomía local. Saboreaba cada bocado con la imparcialidad que acostumbro mantener en una primera cita. Sin embargo, con cada cucharada, sentía que mis defensas se desmoronaban. Al cierre del primer día juntos, mi amor por la comida sonorense era un hecho.

 

Claro que ya había coqueteado en uno que otro momento con la comida mexicana: un burrito por aquí, un taco por allá, una que otra quesadilla y luego ese platillo que realmente nada tiene que ver con México, los nachos. Sin embargo, la comida mexicana seguía siendo un misterio para mi; era una cocina conocida, pero no vivida.

 

No fue hasta que aterricé en Sonora y levanté el velo de esa primera tortilla que empecé a comprender exactamente de qué trataba esta famosa comida mexicana. Sí, hay frijoles, hay queso y hay más clases de maíz de lo que uno se imagina. Pero la cocina mexicana es mucho más complicada.

 

En mi primer día en El Agave Café me presentaron una salsa roja y una verde, cual de las dos más deliciosas. Éstas, junto con un rico guacamole, se sirven de aperitivo antes de casi todas las comidas en el café. Lo disfruté todo con una botella de cerveza Pacífica, y acto seguido me tomé una picosa sopa de tortilla, unas enchiladas acabadas de salir del horno y un dulce flan de coco. Nada mal para ser nuestra primera cita.

 

Entonces, a menos de 24 horas, nos encontramos sentados frente a la mesa para el desayuno con los tradicionales frijoles refritos, los huevos mexicanos y los chilaquiles, acompañados por jugos de fruta fresca. Y eso que lo iba a tomar con calma. Esa tarde salí a caminar por el pueblo de Álamos y me presentaron los mercados locales. Aquí, los churros, las coyotas y el pan dulce (algunos a la venta desde la cajeula de una camioneta) compiten por el negocio de los chiquillos con dinero y en pos de azúcar. Yo opté por las papitas con jugo de limón y chile.

 

Durante las próximas 48 horas, me sedujo una sopa de chile verde, seguida de unas tostadas, un chile relleno y una chimichanga. Pero mi plato favorito, por encima de todos, fue un plato de tamales.

 

Y así, de repente, se acabó mi jornada en Sonora, y me fui con el corazón encogido pero la barriga contenta.

 

Ahora bien, aquí estoy sentada ahora observando el Mar de Cortés desde el pueblo de San Carlos con una rica margarita de tamarindo en mano, y me voy dando cuenta que ésta es una historia de un amor que perdura…

 

Para más información de Sonora, y de México, visite: www.visitmexico.com.

 

 

¡Gracias, Travel Blackboard!

To read this article online, please visit http://www.etravelblackboard.us/article/100400

  Wednesday, February 08, 2012
Hacienda de los Santos, Alamos

Cuando el polvo del desierto da paso a las calles empedradas y un festival alocado y divertido irrumpe el silencio de la tarde; cuando el sonido de la música te llena y te aprendes la letra casi sin querer; cuando, ya ronco y con los pies adoloridos, te encuentras frente a la hermosa fachada de la Hacienda de los Santos… es que por fin llegaste.

Según Leonard Cohen, un santo es aquél que trabajo entre el caos, pero que mantiene el equilibrio con amor. Entonces la Hacienda de los Santos es una maravilla santificada en esta ciudad de música y de fiesta, y nos deshacemos en el portal cuál chiquillos.

 

Las buganvillas adornan las paredes del patio, el cuál encierra una alberca de hermosa superficie pulida. Nos dan la bienvenida con un vaso de dulce agua de jamaica y nos quedamos embelezados mirando hacia la Sierra.

 

Se me había olvidado que hay ocasiones en que el hotel resulta ser el destino.

 

La Hacienda de los Santos cuenta con 27 habitaciones, suites y villas, cada una con nombre de santo. Entonces se me ocurre que estoy en el Cielo, porque aquí moran los santos… o por lo menos nos visitan mientras estamos dormidos.

 

Cada habitación tiene alma propia y su decoración es individual, pero aquí el confort es primordial: es casi imposible salirse de la cama por cómoda, y el cuarto de baño tiene detalles que ni siquiera sabía que me harían falta.

 

También cuentan con un teatro, además de comedores privados, en el sentido de que aún cuando están llenos, siempre te encuentran un rinconcito sereno.

 

Luego de una noche de ópera y música en las calles, regresamos a nuestras habitaciones y encontramos la chimenea encendida, la alberca afuera rodeada de velas y una botella de tequila Murmullo (sólo uno de los 400+ tequilas que forman parte de la colección del bar) esperándonos en la Villa Presidencial.

 

“¿Necesita un jardinero?” le pregunto al dueño, Jim Swickard. Él piensa que estoy relajando, pero es que el Álamos dentro y fuera de las paredes de la Hacienda de los Santos tiene el poder de seducir al turista y convertirlo en residente, y yo me quiero quedar aquí, en esta Casa de los Santos, el mayor tiempo posible.

 

Fotos cortesía Hacienda de los Santos

 

Para más información, visite www.haciendadelossantos.com

 

Source = e-Travel Blackboard: Gaya Avery

Hacienda de los Santos en “You Tube”

Disfrute del video… ¡Es fácil imaginarse aquí!

En México marque el 01-647-428-0222 para hacer sus reservaciones.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Don’t Miss This!!!

Smile Box from Holiday Guests….

http://secure.smilebox.com/ecom/openTheBox?sendevent=4d6a6b7a4d7a67354e6a46384e5445354f44597a4e7a673d0d0a&sb=1

Paste the link to view.

Love to all…..